A morning in Jerez

Just two weeks after arriving in Seville, I had itchy feet and knew I needed to get out and explore Andalucia. After a quick deliberation, I jumped on Renfe and booked a quick trip to Jerez de la Frontera, or Jerez as it’s usually shortened to. The journey from Seville to Jerez takes about an hour.

The beautiful cathedral of Jerez, surrounded by sherry distilleries

Jerez is a beautiful city, closer to the coast than Seville. And what it’s known for is in its name, Jerez – or sherry in English.  But it also has a second claim to fame, it’s dancing horses! Every Thursday at the Fundacíon Real Escuela Andaluza del Arte Ecuestre the horses put on a show and show off their best moves! (Tickets are from 13-27€ depending on where you’re sat).

But naturally, I missed out on this and visited on a Friday!

The Alzacar in Jerez - not quite as famous as Seville's

The train station is just outside the centre of the city but it’s only a short 15-minute walk before you’re in town. One of Jerez’s most famous sights is the Cathedral, built in the 17th century and looks out over the rest of the city. As well as the insane interior and museum pieces, there’s also a peaceful orange garden out the back. I took my notebook with me and ended up sitting there for about half an hour enjoying the peace. Next to the Cathedral, you’ll find the Alcazar, which was first built in the 11th century, and still maintains some of the original Moorish features. It’s full of history, and amazing views. My favourite part, despite how odd it sounds, was the roof of the Arab Baths!

Water fountains and flags in Jerez's city centre

My visit ended shortly after these two, but there’s plenty more to see;

  • Wherever you look, you’ll find a Bodega – or storehouse for maturing wines/sherries. Some of the more popular Bodegas are Bodega Fundador and Bodegas Faustino Gonzalez. If you’re not fussed on where you go to try some sherry, pop into any open doors as you wonder, they’re bound to be good!
  • Feria del Caballo – Every May (usually the week after Seville’s Feria, and the day after I went!) Jerez celebrates its own Feria, and unsurprisingly, horses have a big influence! It’s celebrated by locals opening up casetas on the streets, and serve food and drink to the visitors. There’s also usually a funfair, lit up with fairy lights!
  • Cartuja de Jerez- The Cartuja is an old monastery located outside the city of Jerez, approximately a fifteen-minute drive from the Cathedral. It was built in the 1400’s by the first Friars to visit the area. The gardens can be visited Tuesday- Saturday, and the inside is open during the hours of worship.

 

The Alcazar in Jerez

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Seville in a summary

La catedral de Sevilla, catedral gótico mas grande del mundo

Seville was hot. Seville was beautiful. Seville was everything I needed at the right moment in time.

If a dream internship miraculously ends up being advertised on your facebook just hours before the closing date, you’ll be silly not to apply, right? Right! And just under a month later, I’d packed my bags and headed on a train to London, ready to complete a week-long course before I flew out to Seville.

The first few weeks were cool (both weather-wise and in general) filled with thunderstorms, the first days at work in a new job and lots of city explorations. Thankfully the storms died down, although so did our enthusiasm for Spanish lessons. Cañas of beers were drunk, tapas devoured and we soon settled into our Sevillano lifestyle.

It’s so easy to spend money here, however. One cheeky drink with a tapa, three/four/five times does start to add up, and with only a small stipend it was easy to panic. Although Seville has so much to offer, I found myself booking weekend after weekend away, seeing as much as Andalusia as possible, on the smallest budget. And this meant sacrifices. The end of June brought both Pride and a concert over the same weekend, with 13 hours on a coach over two days to experience it all.

The seafront of Cadiz, showing off why it's been compared to Havana, Cuba.

Work, of course, had to play a big part in what we did. Four days a week, I sat down and got to work for a tour company, working on their social media, and thanks to it being such a small business, learning about all the different aspects of running a bespoke tour company.

The whole experience was such a blur, time passed at a funny pace, and now I’m back home, it’s hard to believe that three months passed. It’s time to put all those new skills into practice, and on to the next adventure!

The beautiful cathedral of Jerez, surrounded by sherry distilleries